On-farm prevention of infection

On-farm prevention of infection

At the highest level, biosecurity is about the protection of New Zealand's economy, environment and people's health and social and cultural wellbeing from pests and diseases. It includes trying to prevent new pests and diseases arriving, and eradicating or controlling those already present.

To the deer farmer, 'biosecurity' means rules and actions designed to protect a population from unwanted organisms that affect pasture and/or livestock at a national, regional and individual farm level.  It involves the systematic adoption of practices designed to keep out pests and infections.  

Biosecurity is therefore about managing risk to prevent the introduction of diseases to an enterprise and to prevent the spread of disease between farms or to a disease free area.  It is important to carry out on-farm practices in a manner that reduces the risk of spreading unwanted diseases, and maintaining vigilance so as to be able to detect unwanted diseases.

Infection may be introduced onto a farm through the following things:

  • New Stock
  • Vehicle/People movements
  • Stockfeed
  • Infected wild animals and wildlife entering boundaries

For detailed information, see the 2013 Drystock Biosecurity Guidelines.

Managing risk to prevent the introduction of diseases to a property and to prevent the spread of disease between farms or to a disease free area is vital.
Advice on what to do if you suspect the presence of a notifiable disease on your property.